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Gethin

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Reading transports you to another time, another place.  I just read the newspaper now and I'm poorer for it. 😞

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“Social media & the press are currently incentivized to drastically exaggerate narratives of division. This in turn creates more division & the downward spiral continues. I hope to build tech that changes these incentives. I believe there is much more love than hate in the world.” ~ Lex Fridman

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You know, If I went back to reading again, it would save me £28/mth paying for newspapers.  But then again, I can't get to the library now as I'm too decrepit, buying the books would far outweigh the cost of the newspapers... so I guess I stick with them now.

I used to love autobiographies and cheesy historical novels.  Hey ho, that was then, this is now, I do what I can cope with.

 

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Hi Kath, certainly having in your hands a book made of sheets of paper is not only a pleasure for the mind but also a tactile pleasure.
However, you could read lots of books without spending a pound by downloading them to your PC in pdf format. There are many websites from which you can download many books of all kinds for free.

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1 hour ago, Gregorius said:

Hi Kath, certainly having in your hands a book made of sheets of paper is not only a pleasure for the mind but also a tactile pleasure.
However, you could read lots of books without spending a pound by downloading them to your PC in pdf format. There are many websites from which you can download many books of all kinds for free.

I read books in a comfy chair with a cup of coffee, e-books do not give me the same pleasure, I tried it, it's not the same 😞

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11 hours ago, Kath said:

I read books in a comfy chair with a cup of coffee, e-books do not give me the same pleasure, I tried it, it's not the same 😞

I think so, too! You are absolutely right. An e-book will never give the same emotions as from a paper book

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12 hours ago, Gregorius said:

I think so, too! You are absolutely right. An e-book will never give the same emotions as from a paper book

I feel the need to read To Kill a Mocking Bird, because it comes up so much in quizes, odd I  know.  I saw the film years ago with Gregory Peck, but I don't really remember the story.  So I want to experience the story with a book, they are so different from films.

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11 hours ago, Kath said:

I feel the need to read To Kill a Mocking Bird, because it comes up so much in quizes, odd I  know.  I saw the film years ago with Gregory Peck, but I don't really remember the story.  So I want to experience the story with a book, they are so different from films.

To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel by the American author Harper Lee

Plot summary

The story, told by the six-year-old Jean Louise Finch, takes place during three years (1933–35) of the Great Depression in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, the seat of Maycomb County. Nicknamed Scout, she lives with her older brother Jeremy, nicknamed Jem, and their widowed father Atticus, a middle-aged lawyer. Jem and Scout befriend a boy named Dill, who visits Maycomb to stay with his aunt each summer. The three children are terrified, yet fascinated by their neighbor, the reclusive Arthur "Boo" Radley. The adults of Maycomb are hesitant to talk about Boo, and few of them have seen him for many years. The children feed one another's imagination with rumors about his appearance and reasons for remaining hidden, and they fantasize about how to get him out of his house. After two summers of friendship with Dill, Scout and Jem find that someone is leaving them small gifts in a tree outside the Radley place. Several times the mysterious Boo makes gestures of affection to the children, but, to their disappointment, he never appears in person.

Judge Taylor appoints Atticus to defend Tom Robinson, a black man who has been accused of raping a young white woman, Mayella Ewell. Although many of Maycomb's citizens disapprove, Atticus agrees to defend Tom to the best of his ability. Other children taunt Jem and Scout for Atticus's actions, calling him a "nigger-lover". Scout is tempted to stand up for her father's honor by fighting, even though he has told her not to. One night, Atticus faces a group of men intent on lynching Tom. This crisis is averted in an unexpected manner: Scout, Jem, and Dill show up, and Scout inadvertently breaks the mob mentality by recognizing and talking to a classmate's father, and the would-be lynchers disperse.

Atticus does not want Jem and Scout to be present at Tom Robinson's trial. No seat is available on the main floor, but the Rev. Sykes invites Jem, Scout, and Dill to watch from the colored balcony. Atticus establishes that Mayella and Bob Ewell are lying. It is revealed that Mayella made sexual advances toward Tom, subsequently resulting in her being beaten by her father. The townspeople refer to the Ewells as "white trash" who are not to be trusted, but the jury convicts Tom regardless. Jem's faith in justice is badly shaken. Atticus is hopeful that he can get the verdict overturned, but Tom is shot and killed while trying to escape from prison.

Despite Tom's conviction, Bob Ewell is humiliated by the events of the trial, Atticus explaining that he "destroyed [Ewell's] last shred of credibility at that trial." Ewell vows revenge, spitting in Atticus' face, trying to break into the judge's house and menacing Tom Robinson's widow. Finally, he attacks Jem and Scout while they are walking home on a dark night after the school Halloween pageant. Jem suffers a broken arm in the struggle, but amid the confusion, someone comes to the children's rescue. The mysterious man carries Jem home, where Scout realizes that he is Boo Radley.

Sheriff Tate arrives and discovers Ewell dead from a knife wound. Atticus believes that Jem was responsible, but Tate is certain it was Boo. The sheriff decides that, to protect Boo's privacy, he will report that Ewell simply fell on his own knife during the attack. Boo asks Scout to walk him home. After she says goodbye to him at his front door, he disappears, never to be seen again by Scout. While standing on the Radley porch, Scout imagines life from Boo's perspective.

from Wikipedia

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eBook readers/tablets opened new worlds for me.

Sure I miss the feel and smell of paper books but my reader has magazines, news papers, encyclopedias and hundreds (thousands?) of books.

I'm 73 and in recovery from cancer so I doubt I'll live long enough to read them all but try I will!!!

 

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